Grow Your Own Easter Grass

Grow Your Own Easter Grass

Happy first day of spring! Can you believe that it's here? I am a little in disbelief since we received several inches of snow on Saturday, which quickly melted away on Sunday. We are calling it "third winter" here on the farm. We are slowing beginning to see how much we will truly be living by the weather; it's something that I now check up on several times a day. I thought that sharing some ideas for growing Easter Grass might be a fun way to welcome the new season on its equinox. Growing grass in pots in not a new idea; in fact, Jill gave me this idea after telling me that it was something she did as a kid. I wanted to share this blog post now so that you can plant your grass before Easter arrives! Even if you don't celebrate Easter, this is still a really wonderful idea to welcome in spring, don't you think?

How to Grow Grass

Picking which type of grass you want to grow can be fairly easy. There are lots of wonderful ornamental grasses on the market, but I don't think that's really what we want here! I decided to pick something that would germinate within days, mature just as quickly, and be edible for our cats who apparently have decided that they enjoy being outdoors during the day and indoors at night. Cats will eat your plants that are within reach, so I went with a cat grass from Botanical Interests. This particular packet is an oat grass, but you can also grow rye or barley seeds for them as well. I also considered growing wheatgrass which is an excellent source of nutrients and can be juiced and consumed. Sustainability, man! 

  1. Pick a planter that has plenty of depth and, at best, drains easily. You can also use clay pots, which I think contrast well.
  2. Fill with a potting medium, I think seed starter is always best, and leave enough room to cover with another 1/2 inch of soil.
  3. Scatter as many grass seeds as possible, in a thin layer, but with hardly any space between seeds. You want the grass once sprouted to come in thick! 
  4. Cover with another 1/4" to 1/2" of potting soil. Water generously. 

Grass seedlings will emerge in about 3 to 10 days. For the best sprouting results, it's best to keep the container you planted in someplace warm. Seedlings need around 75-85° Fahrenheit to germinate successfully. On top of heat mat, heat blanket, or even on top of your refrigerator is a great place. Once sprouted, you can remove them from heat and place them in a sunny window. If you are hoping to use the grass as decor, just leave it in the sun and then place wherever you like when guests arrive! We'll be using our pots on the dining room table to act as a centerpiece!

To maintain your grass, you can clip it often! If you are using cat grass and have cats, they'll keep it trimmed for you. Just like grass outside, it will continue to grow back vigorously when trimmed. Just take a pair of garden or herb scissors and give it a good snip, taking off about a third of the plant. It's good for you to eat, too, so you could always sprinkle it on your salad or toss it into a smoothie! 

I decided to include our new ducklings in these photos! Eek! I announced on Sunday that we decided to pick up some cute little ducks at the feed store over the weekend. We weren't planning to bring home any animals yet, but we just couldn't resist. Aren't they sweet? I'll share more about them here on the blog this Friday in a new Homestead Update! (:

If you are looking for some more Easter related ideas and crafts, you can try making my naturally herb dyed Easter eggs. I used them in these photos, and I just adore it! Placing some eggs in your grass gives it such a sweet and natural touch. I also think just a plain brown speckled egg, or even a green or blue laid egg, can be so beautiful. Dyeing eggs naturally is incredibly easy! Enjoy!

xoxo Kayla


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